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Kuhlman Cellars

Kuhlman Cellars Blog


 

 
September 9, 2015 |

Carignan

Carignan is a red wine grape known for producing well structured, dry red wines, yet little seems to be written Carignan at Cobb Family Vineyardregarding this “under the radar grape”. The truth is, it has significant prominence in both the old world and new world and it is more commonly blended in everyday red wines than one might think, despite not gaining much press. Pronounced “care-in-yawn”, it is a powerful and opulent grape known for deep and concentrated color, bold tannins and high retained acidity. This is no wimpy fruit; it is structurally sound and offers tremendous presence, especially when utilized as a primary blending grape.

For those of you not familiar with this grape, just imagine if the well know Merlot and Syrah grapes were to mate, the best qualities of each of those varieties are similar to what Carignan showcases. The variety is presumed to be from Spain originally and is still prevalent in Catalonia, Spain. It is also well known in southern France, from the Languedoc-Roussillon region in particular. California has been growing and blending Carignan for decades and there are mature Carignan vines producing fruit in the Texas High Plains. This grape variety needs to be cultivated in relatively warm and dry climates, as it can be prone to powdery and downy mildew and requires a warm growing season to achieve proper ripeness. The vines tend to be vigorous and must be well managed to produce quality, concentrated fruit. Having said that, Texas seems like a pretty great place to grow Carignan.

Cobb Family Vineyard Carignan

At Kuhlman Cellars, we originally planted Carignan in our family experimental block in 2012.  We believe this is the first planting in the Fredericksburg AVA.  We also believe in its potential as a possible backbone grape for our blending family. It provides a well-balanced yet massive backbone if crop yields and vine canopy are well managed. For those of you who have tasted the 2012 Barranca, you know exactly what I mean. Wines with finesse, power and character come from these interesting blends. We also planted Carignan in our estate vineyard in the Texas Hill Country in 2015.  Our largest block, Block 5, with approximately 2.3 acres of Carignan, will be producing fruit in the coming years on the Kuhlman Cellars Estate property. Our usually dry/hot summers, as well as our clay topped limestone soils in central Texas provide a suitable environment for harvests of intense, ripe fruit from our vineyards, so the future of Carignan in our wine program is exciting!

Carignan 2015 harvest

Below is a list of known Texas vineyards currently growing Carignan:

Bingham Family Vineyards- Texas High Plains

Brushy Creek Vineyards- Alvord, Texas

Buena Suerte Vineyards- Texas High Plains

Kuhlman Cellars- Texas Hill Country

La Pradera Vineyard- Texas High Plains

Martin Vineyard- Texas High Plains (believed to be the oldest Texas vines still in production)

CFV Carignan Cluster

Let’s celebrate the wine life, Vina Vita, and savor everything that is… Carignan.

 

Cheers!

Time Posted: Sep 9, 2015 at 5:37 PM
Christopher Cobb
 
June 22, 2015 | Christopher Cobb

Estate Vineyard Block 2: Marsanne

For those of you who’ve recently visited the winery, you may have taken note of the new vineyard and the growing vines.  With all the rain, we have a wide range of growth!

Overall at the estate, we have five different vineyard blocks ranging from just under and acre to about 2.3 acres in size.  This represents Marsanne vinesanywhere from about 800 to just over 2100 vines per block.  Of the five blocks, we planted 3 of them back in April representing about 3300 vines total. 

Block 2, just north of the winery building and the vineyard section you see when you first drive into the estate, is planted with Marsanne.  Marsanne?  This grape may be unknown to many folks, but we believe it holds good promise as we continue seeking the best varieties for our climate and soil.

So, what is Marsanne?

Marsanne is a white grape, thought to have originated near the town of Marsanne, France, located in the northern Rhone valley.  While the name may not be familiar, white wines from Hermitage, St. Joseph, Crozes-Hermitage and St-Peray are often predominately Marsanne blends.  In fact, Marsanne is the most widely planted white grape variety in the northern Rhone.  Marsanne is also found in the southern Rhone valley, where it can be found in white Cotes du Rhone wines.

Interestingly enough, Austrailia has the most Marsanne vines in the world, accounting for about 80% of the worldwide total.  Marsanne was brought there in the 1860’s and the oldest Marsanne vines in the world are found there dating back to about 1927.

There isn’t much Marsanne yet growing in Texas.  A couple of growers up in the High Plains are growing it, including VJ Reddy and Tyler Oswald.  Mike McHenry has a block of Marsanne up near San Saba.

 

Marsanne in the Vineyard

We selected Marsanne for our estate vineyard because of the expected viticulture characteristics.  It tends to bud late in the spring, typically about 11 days later than Viognier, which is important when we are dealing with spring frost events.  It also tends to have less disease issues, partly due to the looser grape clusters which promotes better air circulation.  It also produces wines of great character and structure, something we like when considering blending with our other white grape planted in Block 4 (and sister vine to Marsanne) – Roussanne.

So far at the estate, the vines are growing well in our clay-dominated soil over a limestone base.  The rain so far has allowed the vines to grow without supplemental irrigation, a rare treat here in Texas.  However, the high rainfall we’ve had this spring is causing its own challenges with standing water and disease pressure.  Of course, we won’t get any fruit from these vines this year, though we might get a small sample in 2016.  Look for a true harvest in 2017 with wine released perhaps in 2018.

 

Also, feel free to come on out and walk the vineyards and look at these wonderful vines!  

Time Posted: Jun 22, 2015 at 8:00 AM
 
May 29, 2015 |

Texas Terroir, a brief synopsis

There are so many factors involved in producing a quality bottle of wine, as things all begin in the vineyard and make their way to the cellar. Most of us can certainly agree, weather and soil play a very important role in winemaking. What better place to discuss soil types than in the Lone Star State. Texas itself sits on a rock shelf and depending on where you live in our wonderfully enormous state, you either have a little or a whole lot of rocks in your backyard. There is a reason most central Texans construct raised gardens, it is because you can literally bend a pick axe trying to dig into the limestone and caliche. Who wants to rent a Bobcat just to plant tomatoes?

Let’s talk a little about the two largest AVA’s in Texas, and how different the soils can really be. Understand this story is not a definitive- end all lecture about the structure of Texas dirt, merely a brief explanation of some of the key differences between the soil of Central Texas, vs that of the Texas High Plains. With such a large wine style dynamic between fruit from the Hill Country vs the High Plains, there has to be something unique regarding each region right? The answer is yes, both in climate and dirt, this thing we call terroir. What is terroir exactly? Simply put, it is the all-encompassing word for wind, rain, temperature, soil, elevation, etc, of a given region. Here are some interesting facts on the two prominent regions we are discussing.

 

Texas Hill Country AVA:

Impressively the second largest AVA in the United States, it covers 9,000,000 acres (14,063 square miles) and contains 2 sub regions; Bell Mountain AVA and Fredericksburg AVA. Elevation can range from roughly 1,000 ft MSL to over 2,500 ft MSL. The weather in central Texas is typically hot during the growing season.  Hill Country daily high temperatures average in the in the mid 90’s, while the nights drop into the low 70’s. The soils vary in this region, but limestone and caliche reign. For example, the Kuhlman Cellars Estate Vineyard sits on a bedrock of Caliche with a clay topsoil. There are spots in the vineyard where the clay is only a few inches deep, you can ask our vineyard team. I cannot tell you how many vines we placed directly on white chalky rock when we planted the estate vineyard in April, 2015. It is basically “set the roots on rock, replace the soil, and wish it good luck”. Struggle little fella, struggle! The rocky terroir of central Texas is typically well draining, though the clay can cause all sorts of issues since it retains moisture. The caliche provides good mineral component to the wines made from these vineyards.

 

 

Texas High Plains AVA:

This is the second largest AVA in Texas and it also contains the most vines. It’s estimated, west Texas grows 90% of the fruit grown in the state, especially in the Brownfield/ Lubbock area. The Texas High Plains is far different from the Hill Country in a few ways, the elevation is significantly higher allowing for more of that much needed diurnal shift. Elevation in this region ranges from around 2,500 ft MSL to over 3,700 ft MSL. The soil is mainly composed of red dirt/sand with loam as well. There is quite a bit of rock in Lubbock, but it is typically buried under several feet of the famous red dirt. Sand is very well draining soil. Humidity levels here are typically very low, making the region ideal for grape growing, by reducing the incidence of fungus and molds.

In terms of temperature, the high plains tends to be slightly cooler during the days and the nights cool off into the mid to upper 60’s, providing a larger diurnal shift which helps the grapes rest and recover overnight. 

  

 

All in all Texas is a diverse place to grow grapes and to make fine wines. I hope this brief synopsis helps you to understand a bit more about our local industry and what makes our two biggest AVA’s so unique, fun and interesting.

 

Time Posted: May 29, 2015 at 8:00 AM
Christopher Cobb
 
May 17, 2015 | Christopher Cobb

The Speed of Wine Tasting

The other day, someone asked me how long it takes for a vineyard to produce wine.

 

For us, it took two years to find our family vineyard with all the appropriate physical and siting characteristics.  We planted four years ago, and just this past year we took a small fruit harvest.  We were so pleased last year in August 2014 to harvest that inaugural fruit!  The wine currently sits in French oak barrels resting and aging.  Our best guess today is the wine might be available in another 18 months.  Perhaps late fall of 2016.  Indeed, 7 years to produce wine!

 

The bottom line: there is nothing fast in growing wine!  

 

So, why do we often find ourselves in such a hurry to be tasting wine?  As we rush along from place to place, person to person, task to task, and appointment to appointment, what is the rush to get through a wine tasting and race off to something else?  

 

For us, the best wines were always the ones we've shared with friends and family, often around the dining table with food.  These are the times when we relax and slow down--savoring life and the rich experiences making everything worthwhile.  In our tasting room, we often talk about the Four F’s: Food, Family, Friends and the Fellowship which naturally occurs when the first three are found together.

 

Vina Vita Tasting

 

This is why our tastings are relaxed, seated experiences complete with food pairings and conversations.  As Jeremy often says, “sip, savor and enjoy!”  This, to us, is Vina Vita - The Wine Life!

 

Give us a call, come on out and visit us.  Step off US290 and slow down during one of our easy paced, nearly hour long tasting experiences and enjoy our wine flight with unique chef designed food pairing bites.  It's a great opportunity to taste wine at the speed of growing... enjoy!

Time Posted: May 17, 2015 at 8:00 AM
 
March 31, 2015 |

Green Efforts

Being "green" is not just a trendy-hip thing these days. Offering mother earth a friendly helping hand is becoming a necessity as the world population steadily increases, as does our waste production both in trash, and waste water. Here at Kuhlman Cellars, being green is very much part of our daily business. Everything from the plates we serve our Chef prepared food on, to the machine we use to sanitize our tanks, they are very earth friendly. Below is a list of things we do to maintain our steady track in keeping our planet happy.
 

Compost bin:

As you walk from the parking lot to the tasting room, you might notice the large compartmented wooden box sitting to your left near our garden, this is the compost bin. Grass clippings, leaves, paper products, leafy greens, crackers, and fruits all go into the bin and are Kuhlman Cellars Compost Binseventually naturally broken down to be used for landscaping in the garden, flower beds and we will use what we have available for the vineyard. We chose compostable trash bags for daily use in the tasting room, to minimize plastic waste. Utilizing the compost bin enables us to use sugarcane food plates, paper menus, and napkins on a daily basis with little guilt.

Rain capture and grey water system:
The rain gutters on the roof of the winery, as well as the drains in the cellar floor, divert water through an underground piping system to the pond located at the northeast corner of the property. This is a very low tech and efficient means of moving water. Here is a fun fact... One inch of rain captured via our rain gutter system, translates to approximately 10,000 gallons of water collected. Whoa!

The pond:

Our pond, once full, will be a peaceful retreat, an oasis if you will for guests to admire, and it will eventually offer irrigation capabilities for our vineyard, landscaping and garden.

 

Glass and cardboard recycling:

We simply could not call ourselves earth friendly if we did not practice good old fashioned recycling. All of the empty wine bottles, wine boxes, and basically all glass and cardboard products are recycled using two recycling centers located in both Johnson City, and Fredericksburg, TX.
 

Hot CartHot Cart:
This machine is actually one of my favorite gadgets we have at the winery. Instead of using chemicals and excessive water to clean our tanks and cellar floor, we use a hot cart. This device utilizes water heated to 185 degrees and a high pressure stream to
clean and sanitize. This is not only better for the environment, but also for us humans as well.

 

Wine shipping boxes:
The boxes we use for shipping our wines are made in California using solar energy.
Basically, the boxes are produced using a green method, and they can also be recycled after the wine consumer receives their wine. How is that for helping out the environment?
 

It is a great responsibility to be gentle with our loving mother earth, all it takes are a few extra steps in the daily routine to help keep waste to a minimum. Please feel free to ask us anytime about our green habits at Kuhlman Cellars, we are always more than happy to share our practices with each and every one of you.

 

Cheers to Vina Vita, the wine life.

Time Posted: Mar 31, 2015 at 8:58 PM
 
February 19, 2015 |

When good wine goes bad…

Dining out; I venture to guess that this innocuous phrase just evoked a passionate and well rendered memory of your last restaurant experience (for better or worse). Meticulously designed ambience, well-seasoned service professionals and carefully constructed plates of culinary artistry are elements of the dining experience leaving diners elated- or infuriated when confronted with even the slightest missteps. 

A well paired bottle of wine is the great diplomat of your culinary adventure. 

As wine ages it endures pubescent awkward phases, breathes and undergoes a metamorphosis in the bottle, or glass, of Kafkaesque proportions.  These complex changes give us a wine experience most often rewarding, but it is not uncommon that wine presents flaws.  As a consumer you should not drink ‘bad’ wine and have the right to address issues of a detectable flaw with the Sommelier, server or retailer in exchange for an unaffected bottle.

In a professional setting the server or sommelier will present the bottle prior to opening it.  Check the label to ensure it matches the selection from the wine list with attention to the vintage-if it is not what you ordered, ask for an explanation.  Upon opening the bottle, a small sample should be poured (1-2oz) and this is your opportunity to examine the integrity of the wine. 

Listed below are several of the most common flaws:

 

Corked Wine 

Corked wine is the most common flaw presented to consumers.  As early as a decade ago it was estimated 10-15% of natural cork was affected by the presence of a compound generated by mold found growing on wood (cork trees) known as Trichloroanisole (TCA).  While that percentage has improved in recent years, the problem persists. When the TCA infected cork is in contact with wine it taints the product. 

How to identify:  Did you sniff the cork?  I’ve handled thousands of corks pulled from intensely flawed bottles only to find that cork smells like…cork.  Smell the wine!  When opened and in contact with Oxygen the wine will present a dank moldy smell similar to moldy wet cardboard or newspaper.  The musty characteristic will be found on the palate as well and the fruit will be diminished. 

 

Oxidized Wine

Few wines are meant for long term aging. After time, exposure to oxygen begins to degrade the juice creating a chemical breakdown.  This applies to wine both opened and unopened.   White wines will appear ‘orange’ in color when too old.   Red wines are more conducive to age, and older red wines will take on a ‘brickish’ hue.  Opened wines begin the quick descent and begin to show degradation in an average of 3 days.

How to Identify: Examine the color for hints of cloudiness or orange haze. The fruit characteristic of the wine has become unpleasantly sharp much like sucking on a penny or the taste of blood. 

 

Heat Damage 

Wine has a delicate constitution and will become flawed if not properly stored.  Ideally wines should be stored between 50-60 degrees.  Exposure to high temperatures can destroy the composition of a wine in as little as 15 minutes. 

How to identify:  Liquids expand when heated.  The pressure of heated air can cause the cork to begin to push up out of the bottle creating a detectable ‘bump’ between the cork and bottle neck.  The cork itself will show veins of wine staining from the bottom.  The juice will take on an unpleasant ‘tangy’ note like canned or cooked fruit.  It can create a heavy and one dimensional effect to the feel of the wine on the palate.

 

Trust your instincts, particularly when you are familiar with the wine in question. Life is simply too short to drink bad wine!


 

Kuhlman wines are now available at several locations in Austin, Houston and San Antonio.  We thank these amazing venues for supporting Texas Agriculture and look forward to bringing wine closer to you! 

 

Austin

Dai Due-2406 Manor Road, Austin TX.  78722

www.DaiDue.com

 

Cripple Creek & Company- 928 Main Street, Bastrop, TX 78602

www.Cripplecreekandcompany.com

 

San Antonio

Cured- 306 Pearl Parkway #101, San Antonio, TX 78215

www.CuredatPearl.com

 

Bohanan’s Prime Steak & Seafood- 219 East Houston Street, San Antonio, TX 78205

www.Bohanans.com

 

JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort & Spa- 23808 Resort Parkway, San Antonio, TX 78261

www.Marriott.com/Sanantonio

 

Houston

Houston Wine Merchant- 2646 S. Shepherd Dr., Houston, TX 77098

www.houstonwines.com

 


A complete, updated list is also found on our website.

Time Posted: Feb 19, 2015 at 7:00 AM
Christopher Cobb
 
February 9, 2015 | Christopher Cobb

2015 Winter Wine Pairing Dinner

We held our first wine pairing dinner on January 31st - what an incredible Vina Vita event!

Chef Chris Cook, the co-founder of the San Antonio Chef Cooperatives, delivered an incredible multi-course dining experience filled with creative flavors, textures and beautiful presentations.  Each course was perfectly paired with a different Kuhlman Cellars wine resulting in gastronomy harmony!

To match the elegance of the food, the dining experience was further heightened by holding the reception in our production and barrel facility and dining in the tasting room.  Of course, our awesome team was there to ensure each guest was served and attended to without want of anything.

We intend to offer these Pairing Dinners quarterly as we rotate the wine tasting pairing menu with the season.  Therefore, please watch for the next dinner in April when we announce the 2015 Spring Pairing menu.

I’ll wrap up now, but please enjoy the short video and selected pictures from the event. 

Vina Vita!

Chef Chris Cook 

Time Posted: Feb 9, 2015 at 7:16 AM
Christopher Cobb
 
February 4, 2015 | Christopher Cobb

2014 In Review

Kuhlman Cellars

2014 in Review
 

2014 was a very busy year for Kuhlman Cellars!  We built the new estate, harvested the inaugural grape crop from the family vineyard and opened our winery doors on October 3rd! 

Looking back, it is pretty incredible to remember the winery estate was only a pasture last January and we started the actual construction in late May.  The team did incredible work to build everything quickly, professionally and beautifully. 

As of today, the vineyard trellising is complete and the winter cover crop is healthily growing.  All told, we have just over 7.2 acres of vineyards, which translates into over 39,000 linear feet of trellis!  

Before and After

 

FEB 28 Vina Vita Club Event:
Our first Vina Vita wine club event is Saturday, February 28 where we will release the 2012 Barranca red wine.

 

  Barranca Bottle

Barranca Label

FEB 13 Hye, TX Progressive Wine Dinner:
Join four wineries around Hye, Texas for an awesome progressive wine dinner with each course at a different winery and tour company transportation provided!  Kuhlman Cellars will present the appetizer course designed by Chef Josh Raymer and paired with both our Calcaria and 
Alluvé!
.

Looking forward to 2015!
 

2015 promises to be an exciting year with many firsts still to come.  We have a calendar filled with many Vina Vita Club events, bottling the 2014 whites in February, plus we will be planting the estate vineyards.  We expect to release new wines throughout the year, so stay tuned for release date information.

As always, we look forward to seeing you at the winery, so please stop by for a tasting with our new Winter Pairing menu, or simply come in for a glass or bottle.  These sunny, and warmer, winter days are wonderful for relaxing on the patio and enjoying the richness of Vina Vita:  friends, family, food (wine!) and the fellowship which occurs when you have all of those present!

 

Valentine's Day Special and Herbed Almonds
we've heard your pleas!

"Alluvé You" Valentines Wine and Almonds:  Share a bottle of Alluvé paired with our special Herb de' Provence Almonds with your special someone this Valentines Day! Includes One Bottle of Alluvé, Two Red Wine Glasses, and two bags of herbed almonds.


Herbed Almonds:  Our "nearly famous" almonds are now available for sale!  Enjoy a half pint jar filled with these incredible almonds and pair with your favorite Kuhlman Cellars wine.  The nice glass jar is reusable, so bring it back to the winery where we will refill it at a discount.  Enjoy!

Time Posted: Feb 4, 2015 at 6:45 PM
 
December 30, 2014 |

Field trip to Kuhlman Creek!

Cobb Family Vineyard

 

On a bitter cold winter day, some of the Kuhlman Cellars team, including myself, were walking the vines at the Cobb Family Vineyard.Sitting in the dry Kuhlman Creek It was a company field trip of sorts and I was excited to finally step foot on the soils of the family "farm". This is where the winery name was born, for Kuhlman Creek which runs through the property and feeds into the Pedernales River when heavy rains fall. During our trip the sky was grey, and the vines had just begun their long winters slumber. Green leaves with hints of red and gold were clinging from the hard worked vines.

The 1 acre test block has been a solid experiment over the last few years of how several grape varieties grow on the family property, just north of Fredericksburg, Texas. The vineyard presently contains 9 different grape varieties. This specific piece of land is blessed with terroir conducive to protecting the vines from hail and late spring freezes. Hills to the north have proven to disrupt the worst of severe Thunderstorms, and downward sloping terrain to the south allows cold air during the late spring to flow through and away from the vineyard. This is especially important in protecting our lovely Viognier from having her gentle buds frozen in late March and early April. The intimate tour of the property that day was given by Diane Cobb, our vineyard matron. I hesitate to call her a vineyard manager, because the love she shows each and every vine, is much more motherly than managerial. 
Diane Cobb
The Vitis Vinifera grape varieties currently planted at the Cobb Family Vineyard:

Aglianico
Alicante Bouschet
Carignan
Mourvèdre
Syrah
Tannat
Tempranillo
Vermentino
Viognier

There is a special estate field blend from the first harvest currently in barrels here at the winery structured solely from the fruit sourced from the Cobb Family Vineyard. This limited release wine will be something to look forward to in a few years once released. This wine will express the unique nuances of the terroir, which is instrumental when it comes to the complexity and individuality of wine.
 

We invite all of you to come experience the splendors of terroir with each of our carefully made wines at Kuhlman Cellars. Each one tells its own story of the dirt, rainfall, sunlight and wind of that particular growing season.

Cheers!
 

Time Posted: Dec 30, 2014 at 4:04 AM
 
December 17, 2014 |

A Holiday Retreat - Wine and Scent

When I was a girl, my grandmother and I spent hours around her kitchen table plotting our holiday activities and indulging in the warm sweetness of freshly baked sugar cookies.  During the long holiday season in Michigan, few things evoked the excitement of Christmas more than the crisp flinty smell of freshly fallen snow.  My grandmother would dress me in layers of cold protection and send me out to forage for a bucket of pure snowflakes to make my holiday favorite; Snow Ice Cream.   With a simple recipe of condensed milk and vanilla extract, she brought my seasonal delight to life with a wave of familiar and comforting vanilla. 

Carefully un-wrapping me from my shell of wet wool warmed by my breath, winter down and leather mittens she indulged in the sticky sweetness of German Riesling.  I would steal sips and swoon at the silky liquid candy.  These rituals are still easily brought to mind by comforting smell of a warm winter wool scarf and with every glass of Riesling enjoyed in my adulthood I am transported back to those long holiday afternoons.

What is wine if not a scrapbook for your nose?

Few imbibements engage as many senses as wine.  Sight delivers critical information about the age and condition of the wine but regales us with myriad of colors inspiring palettes found in artwork, fashion, and interior design. 

We associate familiar sensations and sounds of pouring a glass of wine with celebration and relaxing. The heft of a bottle, the touch of a slender glass stem and the sound of a cork popping all help prepare us to enjoy what we are about to drink.  

This leaves us with Taste and Smell, the two most rewarding elements of your wine experience.

The sensation of ‘flavor’ is a synergistic combination of taste and smell.  When you cannot smell you taste very differently and in a diminished capacity.  Test yourself by chewing a Jelly Bean while your nose is pinched.  Can you recognize the flavor?  Try it again, but open your nose midway through the process.  When do you start to recognize the flavor of watermelon, cherry or black licorice? 

I am frequently asked “At what point do you add the other ingredients or flavors to the wine?”   The answer is never.  The heart of a complex and flavorful wine is a continuous series of complex chemical reactions creating scents unique to the wine through the result of fermentation.   While individual varietals (grapes) will have commonalities, the conditions in which it is grown and the winemaker’s process will influence the resulting flavor profiles.   Your own personal body chemistry also plays a role in how you perceive these scents, which makes this process subjective by definition. 

How do you develop the ability to find these scents and flavors?  Wine is the ultimate example of Scent-Memory.

Sommeliers have made careers of waxing poetic about the dozens of unique flavors found in a singular glass. But, it is each individual’s ‘scent-memory’ that drives our understanding of wine.   Recent Research has shown when areas of the brain connected to memory are damaged, the ability to identify smells is actually impaired.  Let the process come naturally and try to ‘remember’ what you smell: a watermelon Jolly Rancher, a slice of Mom’s famous Cherry Pie or a new pair of leather boots.   Open up a spice rack and put a name to those familiar warm smells.  There is no wrong answer when it comes to describing the flavor of wine, never let anyone tell you what you perceive is incorrect. 

The most important aspect of wine is simply enjoying it.  During this season of Celebration, I challenge you to explore your ‘scent-memories’.  Celebrate your past while creating the mental map for describing wine flavors yet to be savored.  Find your True North wine, your sentimental ‘Grandma’s sweet Riesling’, or make a new memory linking a particular wine to a special time and place.   Most importantly enjoy what you drink, don’t drink what you don’t enjoy and bask in the bouquet. 


Aromatic Wine Recommendation:

2012 Kuhlman Cellars, Roussanne- This Southern Rhone beauty has found a true sweet spot in Texas.  With an aromatic bouquet of honeysuckle and jasmine, the intense stone fruits coat the palate with a honeyed viscosity.  The body offers complex herbaceous characteristics and a long finish. 

2012 Texas Red (49% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, 15% Carignan, 11% Cabernet Franc, 10% Grenache)- With a wonderful nose of baked cherries, sweet baking spices and roses, the body does not fail to wake the palate.  Layers of earth, leather and cinnamon balance with the fresh red fruit and supple, fine, tannins.  

Time Posted: Dec 17, 2014 at 9:46 AM